Bony Bankart Repair

During a shoulder dislocation, the rim of the glenoid (socket) is sometimes broken. Injury to the glenoid increases an individual’s risk for recurrent dislocation. As a result, the glenoid bone fragment should be repaired whenever possible. Dr. Driscoll prefers to perform this procedure arthroscopically whenever possible in order to minimize disruption to the surrounding muscles and to minimize post-surgical pain.

Bony Bankart Repair

Illustration of a bony Bankart fracture as seen at the time of arthrosopic repair. The glenoid (blue) is surrounded by the labrum (white) and has a fracture in the lower right portion. The arthroscope is seen entering the joint from above. Two cannulas (light blue tubes), through which the repair is performed, enter the joint through "portals" in the front and back of the shoulder.

The repair is similar to an arthroscopic Bankart repair. When a glenoid rim fracture is present, however, the sutures are used to repair the fractured glenoid as well as the soft tissues (labrum and capsule), holding the injured structures in place to allow for healing (as shown in the illustration below.

Bony Bankart Repair

Illustration of the completed arthroscopic bony Bankart repair. Note that the bone fragment in the lower right portion of the glenoid is now replaced and secured with suture anchors and high-strength suture.

Arthroscopic bony Bankart repair is an outpatient surgery. Patients go home the same day with a shoulder immobilizer sling. The sling is worn for 4-6 weeks, but may be removed for bathing and physical therapy. Most patients are cleared to return to sports by 6 months after surgery.